Ask a Travel Nurse: Can you help me find housing?

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Ask a Travel Nurse: Can you help me find housing?

Ask a Travel Nurse Question:

Hi!

I’ve been looking for housing in Colorado Springs, Colorado. I want safe, lovely, and affordable. This is my first assignment. Can you help me find housing?

Thank you!

Ask a Travel Nurse Answer:

While we, or I guess I should say I, am not someone to find housing for Travelers, it does allow me to respond with some useful information for those embarking on their first assignment.

You have stumbled upon one of the key issues in taking a travel contract, “Where will you live while on assignment?”

I always caution new Travel Nurses to work with a travel company that provides housing. I also always advise that on a first assignment, the Travel Nurse take the company provided housing. In my opinion, housing is just too much with which to deal, for a first-time Travel Nurse.

You are currently challenged with finding housing that is safe, affordable, furnished, available for your entire assignment (and any possible extensions), and you must be the person to secure the lease, pay any deposits, and deal with any unforeseen complications.

What happens if your contract is canceled? (Not a common occurrence, but it has happened to me). What if your land lord decides that they no longer want to rent to you? (Again, not common, but it happened to me in Hawaii when a land lord decided they would make more money renting to tourists than a Travel Nurse).

I have also walked into an apartment trashed by a previous tenant and an apartment situated in an unsafe neighborhood (literally, cops with guns drawn, apprehending a suspect the DAY I arrived).

In all of the aforementioned situations, I was very happy to have had my travel company do all the worrying about finding me new accommodations. This is especially true when you are just starting a new assignment and trying to get your bearings.

Please understand , I am not saying that taking a housing stipend is a bad thing. I know countless Travelers that would think of doing nothing else. However, it is something that comes with a risk and you need to fully understand that risk before trying to secure your own housing.

While you may try apartment rental sites, hoping to find ones that execute short-term leases, the most popular way for Travel Nurses to find housing would be Craigslist.

In looking up Colorado Springs on Craigslist, I found this post, which I hope will still be active by the time you read this. It is for furnished one-bedroom cottage, for $1000 a month, that states that it is one block away from Memorial Hospital.

However, in the ad the land lord lists that a 12-month lease is preferred and it would be up to you to pay any deposits that they require and ensure that it is in a safe neighborhood. Finding your own housing does require a decent amount of research on the part of the Travel Nurse.

I do wish you luck in finding something that works for you. And, even if things do work out on this assignment, please do not assume everything will always fall into place on every assignment. Because in my experience, it can be exactly the opposite.

Again, best of luck and I hope this helps.

David Morrison

David@travelnursesbible.com

First time bonus!

About the Author:

Hello everyone. I’m a travel nurse originally from Ohio who graduated in 1993 from Mount Carmel School of Nursing in Columbus. I completed a critical care fellowship at Riverside Methodist Hospital in 1994 and started traveling in that specialty a year later. My first travel assignment was in Maui and since that time I have completed close to 40 different contracts in various states with multiple travel companies.

I am the author of Travel Nurse’s Bible (A Guide to Everything on Travel Nursing), in addition to my writings here and in the pages of Travel Nursing publications such as Healthcare Traveler Magazine and American Nurse Today.

I am presently on assignment in Phoenix, AZ and travel anywhere from six to eleven months of the year.

6 Comments on "Ask a Travel Nurse: Can you help me find housing?"

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  1. Kathy

    says:

    I have taken two travel assignments in the past, closer to home, but this time I want to go to California. Anyone out there ever buy a trailer or RV to live in while traveling. Any advice?

  2. Sasha says:

    Hi I’m going to open an Airbnb in our family home in a down stairs furnished apartment in Anchorage, Alaska. I would be I interested in being in a network for housing for traveling nurses. How do I do that?

    Thank you!

  3. Carol B

    says:

    There are several travel nurse related sites on Facebook. Just do a search, and I am sure you will find them. PLUS, if you have a traveler stay with you, and they liked staying w/ you, ask them to put the word out. It is all about networking. Good Luck

  4. David says:

    Hello Kathy and Sasha. Probably the best way for you both to hook up with travel nurses would be via the online travel nursing forums.

    Some good travel nurse forums can be found at ultimatenurse.com, allnurses.com, and the Delphi forum for traveling professionals (go to delphiforums.com, look for the “enter search keywords box in the center, and type “travel nurses”, and the top result is a group called Travel Nurses and Therapists with over 50,000 members).

    Pan Travelers is also another good site with a forum and you can also join Healthcare Travelbook (healthcaretravelbook.com), which is a sort of Facebook style place for travelers, which also has a forum.

    Some of the groups are large enough to have threads already posted on housing and the RV lifestyle.

    I hope this helps.

    David
    david@travelnursesbible.com

  5. Some assignments come with housing. Does a travel nurse make less if housing is included?

  6. David says:

    It depends on your definition of making less. Often, whether you allow the company to find your housing or not, you will make the same hourly rate. However, if you choose to take a housing stipend, rather than take the company housing, then you could find accommodations that do not use all the housing stipend, therefore putting more money in your pocket. Many travel nurses prefer to take the stipend for precisely this reason.

    However, in over twenty years of travel, I have always allowed the company to find my housing as I do not wish to endure the associated hassles. To me, it is worth it to simply make my hourly and enjoy a one bedroom apartment working wherever I may choose.

    David

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