By September 4, 2013 17 Comments

Scrubbing In Premieres October 24 on MTV

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nurses_420Update! MTV’s travel nurse reality show has gone from the working title Nurse Nation to its official title, Scrubbing In.

(Click here to check out the trailer!)

MTV is billing the new show as a “docu-series,” and has announced that Scrubbing In premieres October 24 on MTV, at 9 p.m. Central.

A couple other things have changed and more details have emerged since Travel Nursing Blogs originally covered the show back in August (click here to read that original post), but for the most part, the show is shaping up as expected.

According to MTV, Scrubbing In will be set in an understaffed Orange County, California hospital, with the nurses working a 12-week contract — and working overtime to explore their new city.

The cast is split between vets and newbies. For cast members Tyrice, Chris, Fernando, and Adrian, this is not their first travel nursing rodeo. But Chelsey, Michelle, Crystal, Nikki, and Heather “are looking for a change from their nursing jobs in Pittsburgh, PA” and are on this journey — their first with travel nursing — together.

Some of the show’s content appears to be very true to what travel nurses encounter, such as the everyday challenges of hospital work and the intense, important job of nursing. Also mentioned in the show bio, and relevant to many other travel nurses, is being out of your comfort zone, working to make new friends (and keep the old), dating while on assignment, and feeling the need to constantly prove oneself to the perm staff.

As far as these on-the-job elements go, it seems this show could be one that travel nurses relate to. But, then there’s the after-hours world that will be portrayed by MTV, which is something many travel nurses are nervous about.

The show’s bio concludes, “But it’s not all work and no play — this group loves to blow off some steam during their days off. It’s a lot for these twenty-something’s to take on but this dynamic, fearless and fun-loving group of young nurses are determined to have it all — a rewarding career and personal life.”

Will you be watching when Scrubbing In premieres October 24 on MTV?

Posted in: Travel Nursing

About the Author:

Hi, I'm Sarah Wengert, a creative content writer for the amazing Medical Solutions based in Omaha, Nebraska. While I'm not a travel nurse, I love to travel and I truly appreciate the hard, important work that nurses do. I'm very happy to represent a company that cares so much about its people. Thanks for reading!

17 Comments on "Scrubbing In Premieres October 24 on MTV"

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  1. concerned says:

    Shows aren’t very interesting when travel nurses decide to drink at bars instead of learn how to surf. Or have arrest records and DUIs. Scrubbing In refers to highly trained OR (operating room) nurses. It is demeaning and inaccurate to refer to travel floor nurses as prestigious scrub nurses. Different job, different training, different qualifications. It is dangerous to give people the impression that these people are the ones who are responsible for removing all needles and laps from open wounds in surgery. Nurses WEAR scrubs but very few “scrub in.” Even if these nurses were “scrub nurses” who “scrub in,” this show would be detrimental – no one wants their scrub nurses to delay surgery because MTV moved their cars overnight to make them late. Don’t make a mockery of a respectable profession.

  2. I'm A Nurse says:

    How are they going to keep patient confidentiality? While I agree that this may end up being demeaning to nurses, to which I am not happy about… I don’t agree with the comment made about travel ‘floor nurses’ being any less educated nor inferior to ‘prestigious’ scrub nurses. I have worked with MANY travel nurses who are advanced specialists in intensive care nursing & other ‘prestigious’ positions, to include scrub nurses… It is in these travel nurses that you can meet some of the most educated, experienced & hard working nurses. Sure, you get some that are not so knowledgeable & need extra training or reassignment, but luckily that usually isn’t the norm for reputable agencies. LOVE ALL MY FELLOW NURSES! To see others as unequal or inferior, especially in a general comment is just not cool.
    Let’s hope MTV can respect the profession, the hard work & long hours we put in & respect patient/family privacy!!!

  3. Agree says:

    The comment was not meant to classify one set of nurses as superior to others. The show has a misleading title and fact of the matter is, being an OR nurse does require extra training. Both sets of nurses have their strengths: floor nurses are caring and communicate well with patients’ families while OR nurses are better known for their brusque efficiency than their interpersonal skills. Regardless, the show reflects poorly on the profession, especially given the stunts MTV and the new nursing “company” manufactured to make the nurses’ lives more dramatic and seemingly salacious than they really are. Several of the cast members had arrest records which was why there was a hold up on filming in the hospital (no CA license = hospital at risk of medical malpractice lawsuit). Also, it’s not a very realistic portrayal to be hiring professional surfers to teach them how to surf. What was realistic was that these new, barely hired cast members wanted to drink instead of enjoy new experiences and live quietly interesting lives like most nurses and medical professionals do. Or better yet, go home to their families and get a decent night’s sleep before returning to work the next day. Instead, it was scripted, with fake friends being introduced, first day drama created by MTV moving cars around, handlers for each “nurse” and storyline for each character. Just watch one of the other scripted fake nurse/doctor shows – they’re likely more interesting and shockingly involve less alcohol.

  4. A nurse says:

    First off, there are many nurses that scrub in as well as work floors. Floor nurses don’t just fix boo boos. And most of the time it’s scrub tech scrubbing in to ORs not the OR nurses. Second, if you were anyone traveling to a new city wouldn’t you want to have a good time? You don’t have a quiet family life there to go home to. You moved across the country. Most nurses work 3 12hr shifts a week. So they don’t need to go home and go to bed every night. Having am arrest or DUI in the field is not too uncommon. That goes for a lot of professions. Plus if you wanted to learn to do a new skill wouldn’t you hire a professional to teach you???

  5. I am a nursing student and saw that this show was coming on! Many concerns came to mind and many mixed feelings. Firs my feeling was concern for the patient’s and family’s confidentiality! My second feeling was disappointment! I am so excited to be a nurse and feel very proud to tell people that it is the profession I am studying so hard to do! This is because people respect the nursing profession greatly and do trust us with their health! These nurses don’t seem to be holding themselves to any type or nursing standard in their “after hours.” Don’t get me wrong there is nothing wrong with having a good time after work, but do not broadcast I and portray nurses as irresponsible party men and woman! I’m pretty disgusted by the entire idea of this show!

  6. Nurse's Fiancee says:

    Well I can say for one this show is truly demeaning to nurses. We live in CA and my fiancee has been an RN since ’05 with her BSN and has advanced to a key player for the level 1 tauma center ER trauma unit which she works. She is a TNCC course instructor, holds a handful of other certs, as well as works closely with the various groups of the trauma team ie surgeons, etc. to help fine tune various protocols and procedures where even half of a second can make a life changing difference..

    Now for her in her position and it is truly an elite top tier position.. MANY MANY people wash out trying to successfully earn a place through further training and education for a trauma unit team shift assignment. As for the personal life aspect, yeah, 12hr shifts, take their toll. She works on a team where she is on for 5 days, off for 5 days, then on for 2 days and off for 2 days… so toward the end of that 5th day on stint her mind and body is ready to just shut down for a day or two on her upcoming days off to relax and recoup… sometimes the shifts are spent on her feet for the whole time, but usually eating on the run as not always afforded a legit lunch break due to patient care demands like getting slammed with a half dozen patients rolling in all at once from a bad car wreck.

    Now Re: arrests and convictions she is clean and while I dont know the standards of other states I know with CA they are very strict regarding any criminal incidences. From the nurses who’ve I’ve talked to who had the misforture of an arrest for DUI, public intox, etc etc. they had to jump through many hoops with the court system to keep their license and sometimes even placed on probationary status with the BRN while the court proceedings play out. So say for example they get 3 yrs probation etc with fines etc to avoid jail time, from that point forward their basically on a tight rope not to slip or they can flush their career down the drain and thats usually when the nurse has a come to jesus moment and cleans up their act..

    From my exposure I’ve also personally noticed that ER nurses are more lean fit and trim from always being on the go, at least those who work at a large hospital with a high patient flow, but for the nurses who either start or transition up to the floors, majority of time their patients are fairly stable and on a set treament plan with CNA’s etc making the frequent rounds… which results with a lot of down time and sedentary behavior for the nurse to where they spend a good deal of shift snacking etc so A LOT of the old career floor nurses are usually overweight and borderline unhealthy themselves. I can only imagine how people want to argue this but there IS some truth to it…

    Lastly, when speaking of travelers, regardless of their qualifications most major hospitals sometime assign them to certain areas outside the usual med/surg areas since they already have established teams working other higher acuity areas where they have an established cohesiveness where the hospital usually doesnt want to alter that just for the sake of patient care and not all areas have the same standardized protocol regulations state or country wide.

  7. Nurse's Fiancee says:

    One more thing I just remembered about CA being strict on criminal incidence. I personally know of a couple people who in their younger years were rowdy to either get DUI, assault, public intox, etc arrests. No obvious deal killer felony arrests. Well years later when they grew up and settled down, went to school, etc. they still suffered grief from their old skeletons. Usually being placed on a “probationary” status with the BRN or for some have to have various appeals or hearings to plead their case to show that they’re past was just that and they learned from it and grew up etc..to be granted their RN… So again, this show and the strings it had to pull to get the green light is even more insulting to the profession.

    Lastly, to play devils advocate, there is a reason why some soap operas are based on hospitals because there can be a lot of drama, sex and scandals amongst coworkers especially the bigger the hospital is… but with MTV, of course they are going to force embellish and over exaggerate that “unspoken” part of the medical field for entertainment value but only to cause a more misinformed view of the profession..

  8. Agree says:

    I couldn’t agree more. I question the motivations of a “travel nurse” company that has tried to break into the reality TV arena already, and failed, as well as had to fire everyone and re-brand itself with a new name. Maybe more time should be put into background checks and less time should be spent partying with potential reality TV cast members in Sacramento. For mtv to imply that these “nurses” represent the profession is misleading. Hiring cast members from a struggling travel nurse company with better business Bureau complaints filed for its previous name is detrimental t to the profession. No wonder the Orange County hospital CEO wanted nothing to do with it. Those nurses represent a massive liability and potential future medical malpractice lawsuits by any of the patients in the show given the nurses’ legal problems and delays in CA licensing.

  9. Lynn says:

    With all the Medical workers in DFW, I am surprised they didn’t choose this area.

  10. Unbelievable says:

    Wait, let me guess. The failing travel nurse company is “expanding” there? Go for quality, not quantity. Lame.

  11. T. T. says:

    Worked at the hospital this was filmed and these nurses wanted to work in the icu and er but during orientation, didnt even one the basics. Disappointed in the hospital to allow MTV to mock what real nurses do

  12. Maria says:

    I do not understand the detailed comments about the way nurses will be portrayed. Did I miss something? (Not that I believe MTV will have much dignity and accuracy. ) The premier is on the 24th.

    I am an RN in Connecticut. Any criminal activity must be disclosed resulting in loss of licensure. Is that different in other states?

  13. Miss Melissa says:

    Google, “Change.org Cancel MTV Scrubbing In”.
    Currently, there are over 4,000 of us who feel this show should not be aired for many different reasons.
    Look it up. If you agree sign the petition.

  14. Miss Melissa says:

    This is what America should be seeing, the truth!

    http://www.whatruwaitingfor.com/film/

    Oakland hospital documentary.

    The Waiting Room is a character-driven documentary film that uses extraordinary access to go behind the doors of an American public hospital struggling to care for a community of largely uninsured patients. The film – using a blend of cinema verité and characters’ voiceover – offers a raw, intimate, and even uplifting look at how patients, staff and caregivers each cope with disease, bureaucracy and hard choices.

    The ER waiting room serves as the grounding point for the film, capturing in vivid detail what it means for millions of Americans to live without health insurance. Young victims of gun violence take their turn alongside artists and small business owners who lack insurance. Steel workers, taxi cab drivers and international asylum seekers crowd the halls. The film weaves the stories of several patients – as well as the hospital staff charged with caring for them – as they cope with the complexity of the nation’s public health care system, while weathering the storm of a national recession.

    The Waiting Room lays bare the struggle and determination of both a community and an institution coping with limited resources and no road map for navigating a health care landscape marked by historic economic and political dysfunction. It is a film about one hospital, its multifaceted community, and how our common vulnerability to illness binds us together as humans.

  15. Miss Melissa says:

    There are now over 17,000 who believe this is wrong on so many levels. Google change.org MTV Cancel Scrubbing In and sign if you agree.

  16. Nurses PRN says:

    Nurses, we appreciate and respect you! We put together a little video to express our appreciation. You all are awesome! 🙂

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