By August 17, 2011 1 Comments

Guest Author: Patricia Walling – Moving Out Cleaning Tips for Travel Nurses

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travel nurse cleaning housing before moving outTravel nursing is a stressful job, especially considering one has to pick themselves up and relocate repeatedly each time an assignment is completed. While those in medical coding or other health care professions may not consider how much time travel nurses spend picking up all of their belongings, packing away personal stuff and arranging to move to a new assignment every 13 weeks, it does require major effort and time. All this is compounded by the fact that the apartment must be left in the condition in which it was found when moving in; otherwise penalties may be imposed.

The best way to proceed when getting ready to vacate an apartment is to take a walk through the residence and make a list of all the cleaning and repair jobs that must be carried out. Having a copy of the move-in inspection checklist in hand while this is being done will give you a good idea of what has changed since moving in and needs to be returned to the original condition. An additional precaution is to have the apartment manager or landlord present when this is being done, so any discrepancies can be taken care of in advance and there will be no surprises on the day the keys are handed in. Also, collect all the cleaning and repairing products that will be used to return the apartment to the condition in which it was acquired.

The first place to start is the walls. Remove all wall decorations. Also, remove the nails and fill in all the holes that were not there when you moved in. Sand each spot to yield a smooth finish, so it can be painted over easily. If you have a furnished apartment, the next step is to mend any sofa tears, repair any broken window strings and remove any unsightly stains on the carpet that were not there before.

Once the major issues have been dealt with, the detailed scrub-down begins. Start in the kitchen and clean the fridge first. Any food that can’t be taken along should either be given away to friends or discarded and the fridge should be scrubbed down with soap and water. Empty all cabinets and drawers in the kitchen, and then clean the oven, counters and finally the floor. Move into the bathroom next and soft scrub the sink, tub and toilet with bleach. Finally, shine all the fixtures and the mirror with a window cleaner and paper towels.

Follow through with the rest of the rooms making sure all the closets, dressers and shelves are empty. Dust and wipe down the window panes, blinds and light fixtures. Vacuum the carpet as the last step. The apartment should be completely empty of anything that is not going along with you. Leaving a spare broom or bottles and boxes of cleaning products behind is really not a favor to the landlord or the new tenant. Simply donate or toss any unwanted supplies or items.

Finally, collect all the keys that were issued to you and keep them in one place. Now that everything is clean, schedule a walk-through with the landlord or the manager so that they are  aware that everything is in the condition in which it was given, minus the standard wear and tear. This will ensure that no penalties are imposed.

It is also important to keep in mind that the corporate housing that frequently comes with travel nursing jobs has to be maintained and any damage, other than the normal wear and tear to the interior or exterior, is the responsibility of the tenant. Notifying the employer and landlord of any problems before moving out will inform all parties of what to expect when the final account is settled. This is of benefit to the tenant as any unnecessary charges to their bill will be avoided. However if you take good care of your apartment during your stay and follow the cleaning tips mentioned above, it is likely that the apartment manager will be more than happy to give you your deposit back.

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About the Author:

Patricia Walling is a web content designer in Washington state for several websites regarding medicine and careers in medicine. A self professed perpetual student, she finds herself drawn to researching even the most esoteric information she comes across that she doesn't already know something about. She likes travel, cats, dogs, and children, and above all is interested in healthcare, its history, and its future.

1 Comment on "Guest Author: Patricia Walling – Moving Out Cleaning Tips for Travel Nurses"

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  1. Diane says:

    I guess cleaning ad organizing all the time is one way of doing less chores int he succeeding days! It’s easier to clean everday that make it a habit like once or twice a week.

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